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Course module: ECHUG
ECHUG
Urbanisation and Geography
Course infoSchedule
Course codeECHUG
ECTS Credits0
Category / LevelHB (Bachelor Honours)
Course typeCourse
Language of instructionEnglish
Offered byFaculty of Law, Economics and Governance; Undergraduateschool REBO; Bachelor in Economics and Business Economics;
Contact personprof. dr. J.G.M. van Marrewijk
E-mailJ.G.M.vanMarrewijk@uu.nl
Lecturers
Contactperson for the course
prof. dr. J.G.M. van Marrewijk
Feedback and availability
Other courses by this lecturer
Teaching period
1  (03/09/2018 to 11/11/2018)
Teaching period in which the course begins
1
Time slotB: TUE-morning, THU-afternoon
Study mode
Full-time
RemarkHonours Programme, 3-year in Bachelor
Enrolment periodfrom 28/05/2018 up to and including 24/06/2018
Course application processHonourscoördinator
Enrolling through OSIRISNo
Enrolment open to students taking subsidiary coursesNo
Pre-enrolmentNo
Waiting listNo
Course placement processHonourscoördinator
Aims
Learning objectives
  • Understand empirical information regarding economic data, including the ability to critically appraise and characterise these data.
  • Understand and critically appraise the main theories of Urban Economics.
  • Understand and critically appraise the main theories of Geographical Economics.
  • Discuss, present, and critically evaluate different theories in light of available data.
Content
Human settlements have increased in size ever since the Agricultural Revolution enabled large groups of people to locate together in one place and enhanced the opportunities for further specialisation and the development of institutions. As a consequence, economic activities now agglomerate in large mega-cities (exceeding ten million people). The course Urbanisation and Geography analyses the ongoing processes of urbanisation and agglomeration from an economic perspective with a multidisciplinary state of mind. As such it provides an introduction into the fields of Urban Economics and Geographical Economics.

First, we start with an overview of how the world economy is becoming ‘more spiky’ and the role geo-human interaction plays in this process from an historical point of view. In addition, we review the main empirical methods used in urban- and geographical economics.

Second, we analyse the main aspects of Urban Economics, namely how space is organised within cities (location, transport, housing, density, and amenities), how urban systems develop (power laws, city-dynamics, and quality ladders), and the economics of agglomeration (sorting, matching, learning, and sharing).

Third, we provide the basics of Geographical Economics, with an explanation of the core model (endogenous location with sustain and break analysis) and its extensions (intermediate goods, human capital, many locations, and power laws), and the empirics of geographical economics (home market effect, spatial wages, shocks, and trade costs).

Fourth, and finally, we apply the insights gained throughout the course to better understand the interactions between urbanisation, geography, and economic development, as well as the main policy implications of urban- and geographical economics. We illustrate, analyse, and discuss these issues using information from the 2009 World Development Report (density, distance, and division).
 
Learning objectives
  • Understand empirical information regarding economic data, including the ability to critically appraise and characterise these data.
  • Understand and critically appraise the main theories of Urban Economics.
  • Understand and critically appraise the main theories of Geographical Economics.
  • Discuss, present, and critically evaluate different theories in light of available data.
 
Format
Lectures; two hours per week during eight weeks.
Tutorials; two hours per week during eight weeks.

Assessment method
Presentation – team organised, individually graded, but also based on team effort; 15% of grade.
Discussion – team organised, individually graded, but also based on team effort; 15% of grade.
Country assignment – written, individually graded; 20% of grade.
Final exam – written, individually graded; 50% of grade.

Students are expected to have knowledge of:
A basic understanding of economics principles and methods, possibly by studying the mimeo Introduction to Economics before attending the course.
A basic understanding of mathematical principles and methods, including calculus and linear algebra.

In case online access is required for this course and you are not in the position to buy the access code, you are advised to contact the course coordinator for an alternative solution. Please note that access codes are not re-usable meaning that codes from second hand books do not work, as well as access codes from books with a different ISBN number. Separate or spare codes are usually not available.
 
Entry requirements
Prerequisite knowledge
Students are expected to have knowledge of:
- A basic understanding of economics principles and methods, possibly by studying the mimeo Introduction to Economics before attending the course.
- A basic understanding of mathematical principles and methods, including calculus and linear algebra.
Required materials
-
Recommended materials
Book
Brakman, S., H. Garretsen, and C. van Marrewijk (forthcoming), An Introduction to Urban- and Geographical Economics, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K.
Texts
World Bank (2009), World Development Report 2009: Reshaping Economic Geography, The World Bank, Washington, D.C. - WDR1 = Chapter 1: Density - WDR2 = Chapter 1: Distance - WDR3 = Chapter 3: Division
Reader
Supplementary literature for non-economists: Marrewijk, C. van (2018), Introduction to Economics, mimeo, Utrecht University.
Instructional formats
Lecture

Tutorial

Tests
Discussion
Test weight15
Minimum grade1

Endterm
Test weight50
Minimum grade1

Country assignment
Test weight20
Minimum grade1

Presentation
Test weight15
Minimum grade1

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