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Course module: BMW21819
BMW21819
Unravelling Bias in Science
Course info
Course codeBMW21819
ECTS Credits7.5
Category / Level2 (2 (Bachelor Elaborating))
Course typeCourse
Language of instructionDutch
Offered byFaculty of Medicine; Undergraduate School Biomedical Sciences; Biomedical Sciences;
Contact personG.J. van der Velden
E-mailg.j.vandervelden-2@umcutrecht.nl
Lecturers
PreviousNext 1
Lecturer
dr. G. Dilaver, MSc
Other courses by this lecturer
Lecturer
dr. F.M. ter Heegde
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Lecturer
dr. S.C.A. de Jager
Other courses by this lecturer
Lecturer
prof. dr. A.D. Kraneveld
Other courses by this lecturer
Lecturer
dr. H.M. den Ruijter
Other courses by this lecturer
Teaching period
4  (25/04/2022 to 01/07/2022)
Teaching period in which the course begins
4
Time slotBC: BC
Study mode
Full-time
Enrolment periodfrom 31/01/2022 up to and including 27/02/2022
Enrolling through OSIRISYes
Enrolment open to students taking subsidiary coursesNo
Pre-enrolmentNo
Waiting listNo
Content
Unravelling bias in science

Credits:                   7,5                                                                     Course code: BMW21819
Coordinator:         Dr. G.J. van der Velden                             Period: 4
Examinator:           Dr. G.J. van der Velden                             Time slot: B+C
E-mail address:    g.j.vandervelden-2@umcutrecht.nl     Level: 2
Tel.nr.:                     088-7560633                                        

Capacity: 24 students
Language: English (is also open to exchange students)

Content:
If we take a critical look at science, many biases are present in research settings. Consequently, we have less knowledge about disease progression in women or pharmacokinetics in different ethnic populations. Also, biomedical researchers might not be aware of the biomedical mechanisms underlying unconscious biases that influence their (research) choices. Being aware of implicit biases in science is therefore important as biomedical innovations affect healthcare.
The first half of the course will focus on biomedical knowledge linked to bias. Students will learn which neurobiological mechanisms are behind implicit bias and what the effect is of these biases on research choices. The difference between the terms sex and gender will be discussed and students will be taught about sex-differences in different diseases such as cardiovascular disease as well as sex- and ethnicity-differences in pharmacology. We will discuss the ethical implications of culture-sensitive subjects and students will learn to present sex- and ethnicity-related data in a sensitive manner.
In the second half of the course, students will learn to recognize biased research and will be trained to design research in which bias is minimized. Throughout the course, students will receive interactive workshops to learn different skills needed in research. Finally, students will perform a project in which they will be challenged to generate innovative strategies for raising awareness about biased science and promote better scientific research.

Knowledge requirements:
Basic knowledge of molecular cell biology and genetics, as well as basic physiology and basic mechanisms in immunology are required (Biomedical Sciences bachelor’s program year 1) as well as the contents of the course Organ Systems as offered in the Biomedical Sciences bachelor’s program.

Learning outcomes:
Knowledge and insight:
At the end of the course the student will be able to:
  • explain the molecular, metabolic and physiological differences between men and women in heart disease;
  • explain why different groups react differently to pharmacotherapy on a molecular and cellular level;
  • clarify why there are metabolic differences between different groups based on their genetic differences;
  • explain the neurobiological basis of implicit bias;
  • use the proper nomenclature related to gender and sex differences.

Skills:
At the end of the course the student will be able to:
  • critically evaluate experimental designs in literature for the possible presence of bias;
  • write a research proposal where bias is minimalized;
  • communicate effectively with different cultural groups;
  • present culture-, sex- and gender-sensitive subjects in a sensitive manner;
  • raise awareness of bias and promote diversity in science.

Attitude:
At the end of the course the student will be able to:
  • critically reflect on their own choices in doing research whilst accounting for possible bias;
  • reflect on ethical implications of physiological and genetic differences in target groups in scientific research.

Teaching forms and contact hours:
Lectures, interactive workshops, working groups, group discussions and independent study. The contact time for the course is 70%. This includes time to work on assignments and the project.

Assessment:
Assessment will be based on the literature review (30%), project product (30%), the written exam (30%) and active participation (10%).
Students must attain a ³ 5.0 on all assessment components and a ³ 5.5 final grade to pass the course.

Required materials:
Required literature will be provided at the start of and during the course.


Competencies
-
Entry requirements
You must meet the following requirements
  • Enrolled for a degree programme of faculty Faculty of Medicine
Prerequisite knowledge
Basic knowledge of molecular cell biology and genetics, as well as basic physiology and basic mechanisms in immunology are required (Biomedical Sciences bachelor’s program year 1) as well as the contents of the course Organ Systems as offered in the Biomedical Sciences bachelor’s program.
Required materials
-
Instructional formats
nvt

nvt

tutorial

Tests
Final result
Test weight100
Minimum grade-

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