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Kies de Nederlandse taal
Course module: 201800003
201800003
Youth and sexuality
Course infoSchedule
Course code201800003
ECTS Credits7.5
Category / Level2 (Bachelor Elaborating)
Course typeCourse
Language of instructionEnglish
Offered byFaculty of Social Sciences; Undergraduate School Sociale Wetenschappen; Interdisciplinary social and behavioural sciences;
Contact persondr. M.E. de Looze
E-mailm.e.delooze@uu.nl
Lecturers
Lecturer
M.A. de Boer, MSc
Other courses by this lecturer
Lecturer
drs. P.F. de Bordes
Other courses by this lecturer
Contactperson for the course
dr. M.E. de Looze
Other courses by this lecturer
Lecturer
dr. M.E. de Looze
Other courses by this lecturer
Teaching period
4  (22/04/2019 to 28/06/2019)
Teaching period in which the course begins
4
Time slotB: TUE-morning, THU-afternoon
Study mode
Full-time
Enrolling through OSIRISNo
Enrolment open to students taking subsidiary coursesYes
Pre-enrolmentNo
Waiting listNo
Aims
1) Acquiring knowledge on (being able to reproduce information) and understanding of (being able to provide explanations):
  • the most important historical developments in the field of sexuality in the western world;
  • different theoretical models explaining young people’s sexual behaviour (e.g., the evolutionary, socio-constructivist, and biopsychosocial model);
  • potential determinants and consequences of (un)healthy sexual behaviour.
2) Applying this knowledge and understanding to new cases (e.g., indicating to what extent a specific statement can be explained by a specific theoretical model).
 
3) Analyzing the scientific literature in the field of youth and sexuality (i.e., formulating a good research question; collecting, organizing and critically evaluating theoretical and empirical articles; linking different studies; formulating your own conclusions and the implications of your work).
 
4) Critically evaluating news items (e.g., in a newspaper or magazine) that report on scientific publications in the field of youth and sexuality.
 
Content
'Young peolple in the Netherlands start having sex at a later age; (20 June, 2017)
‘The case for starting sex education in kindergarten’ (27 May, 2015)
‘One fifth of Dutch women is a victim of sexual violence’ (15 January, 2018)

Young people’s sexual development, behaviour and upbringing have changed drastically over the past few decades. While sex used to be a topic people simply would not talk about as short as 50 years ago – especially when it came to youth - young people's sexual health had become a priority in research and public health policy today. While many concerns exist about young people's sexuality (e.g., regarding the impact of exposure to Internet porn and online dating apps), the sexual health of youth in the Netheerlands is relatively good, compared to many other countries. Recent research even suggests that young people's sexual health has improved over the past decade. This raises the question to what extent societal developments relate to young people's sexual development and behavior. This question runs like a red thread through the course. 
 
In this course, we aim to analyze young people's sexual development and behaviour.  We will do so by addressing different theoretical models explaining young people’s sexual behaviour (e.g., the evolutionary, socio-constructivist, and biopsychosocial model); and analyzing potential determinants and consequences of (un)healthy sexual behaviour; and linking scientific research to (recent-) societal developments and debates, both in the Netherlands an dworldwide. Lectures are provided by experts from a variety of organizations, including  Utrecht University,  Rutgers, the Netherlands Institute for Social Research (SCP), and the University of Amsterdam.
 
Competencies
-
Entry requirements
-
Required materials
Yet to be specified
The list of reading materials will be made available on Blackboard.
Instructional formats
Lecture

Class session preparation
Study the selected literature.

Small-group session

Class session preparation
Attend lecture and prepare partial assignments

Contribution to group work
Active participation during class meetings; prepare partial assignments.

Tests
Assignment
Test weight30
Minimum grade5.5

Assessment
The application of your skills to search for relevant scientific articles, compare them and evaluate their quality, and consequently, draw your own conclusions.

Class presentation
Test weight20
Minimum grade5.5

Assessment
Class presentation in which you reflect on the lecture and literature of that week.

Written test
Test weight50
Minimum grade5.5

Assessment
Your factual knowledge on a) the most important historical developments in the field of sexuality in the western world; b) different theoretical models explaining young people's sexual behaviour (e.g. the evolutionary, socio-constructivist, and biopsychological model); c) potential determinants and consequences of (un)healthy sexual behaviour.
Your ability to apply this knowledge to new cases (e.g. indicating to what extent a specific statement can be explained by a specific theoretical model).

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Kies de Nederlandse taal